5 Big Problems

1

One tanker spill could wreck our coastal economy

The Enbridge scheme would bring over 225 crude oil supertankers – some as long as the Empire State Building is tall – to B.C.'s North Coast for the first time ever. One oil spill the size of the Exxon-Valdez would forever damage B.C.'s $50 billion coastal economy. Studies show clean-up could cost $9.6 billion, wiping out all projected economic gains from the pipeline.

2

A wall of First Nations opposition

First Nations across B.C. have formed a wall of opposition against the Enbridge pipeline and tanker plan. Over 130 First Nations have signed the Save the Fraser Declaration against the project. They have pledged to use "all means necessary" to stop Northern Gateway. First Nations aren't the only ones opposed. They are joined by the Union of BC Municipalities and over 60 percent of British Columbians.

3

The record shows Enbridge can’t be trusted

Regulators in the U.S. dubbed Enbridge employees "Keystone Kops" for their incompetent response to the massive 2010 Enbridge pipeline spill in Michigan. Enbridge also lobbied the Canadian government 185 times since July 2008 to water down federal laws (which, in turn, they did). Throughout the Joint Review Panel process, Enbridge has refused to provide basic information about environmental safety. Instead, their employees and lawyers simply say, "trust us." We don't.

4

Major wild salmon rivers at risk

The Enbridge Pipelines would cut across nearly 800 streams and rivers including B.C.’s two largest wild salmon watersheds, the Fraser and the Skeena. A pipeline spill near salmon spawning habitat would be near-impossible to clean up. What do we stand to lose? Our province’s most iconic species – the backbone of our cultures and economy.

5

Doubling down on dirty energy

The Enbridge project is a $6 billion investment in dirty oil infrastructure, at a time when the need to transition to a clean energy future has never been greater. It locks us into an uncertain future for our kids and grandkids. The pipeline would allow the tar sands to grow by 30 percent, increasing greenhouse-gas emissions and killing our chances of meeting pollution reduction targets. In contrast, clean energy projects create more jobs per dollar of investment and reduce harmful emissions.